UX Australia 2013 Day 2: Top 3 Insights

Here’re the top 3 insights from Day 2 which follow the top 3 insights from Day 1.

Groundhogs in the source code: Navigation as cross-channel sense-making by Andrea Resmini

  1. People create their own meanings in places within physical and digital navigational meshes.
  2. Place is a way to understand the world. Intent and meaning is more important than geometry.
  3. The web is a map that leads to somewhere real.
    Andrea Resmini, Groundhogs in the source code: Navigation as cross-channel sense-making

Andrea Resmini, Groundhogs in the source code: Navigation as cross-channel sense-making

One team, one dream: Practical ways to work better, together by Kelsey Schwenk

  1. Traditional methods (such as personality tests) of categorising people into cubicles is flawed.
  2. The VIEW model developed by the Center for Creative Learning looks at relative scales of problem solving styles instead.
  3. We lie somewhere in the following scales: Internal vs. External, Explorer vs. Developer, Person-oriented vs. Task-oriented.
    Kelsey Schwenk, One team, one dream: Practical ways to work better, together

Kelsey Schwenk, One team, one dream: Practical ways to work better, together

Gesture control: Wave goodbye to your remote control and say hello to the future by Sean Smith

  1. There are 2 types of gesture: pointing and semantic.
  2. A combination of the two is preferred by most.
  3. Use both universally common gestures and customised culture-specific gestures.
    Sean Smith, Gesture control: Wave goodbye to your remote control and say hello to the future

Sean Smith, Gesture control: Wave goodbye to your remote control and say hello to the future

From faith-based to evidence-based design: Design by numbers by Miles Rochford

  1. Design decisions based on just intuition are not going to cut it anymore. We need evidence backed by data.
  2. Data is not about proving yourself right or wrong.
  3. Data is not automatically useful.
Miles Rochford, From faith-based to evidence-based design

Miles Rochford, From faith-based to evidence-based design

Designing surveys to get the responses you want! by Hendrik Müller

  1. 10 steps to designing surveys that get unbiased, valid and reliable data: 1. Decide if the survey is the right method 2. Objectives 3. Sampling 4. Questions 5. Avoiding biases 6. Visual design 7. Evaluation 8. Building 9. Fielding 10. Analysis.
  2. People answer more honestly if the survey is anonymous.
  3. People cannot predict the future. Ask about shortcomings, not wish lists.
Hendrik Müller, Designing surveys to get the responses you want

Hendrik Müller, Designing surveys to get the responses you want

Getting UX done by Ian Fenn

  1. Call it ‘critique’, not ‘design review’.
  2. Have smaller pre-meetings before the big meeting.
  3. DILLIGAF!
Ian Fenn, Getting UX done

Ian Fenn, Getting UX done

Designing meetings to work for design by Kevin Hoffman

  1. To help people hear better, start with divergent thinking followed by convergent thinking.
  2. To help people see better, use graphic facilitation (visual note taking).
  3. To help people do better, present and design ideas collaboratively. For example, for each section on the homepage, collectively answer who needs it and what they will do with it.
Kevin Hoffman, Designing meetings to work for design

Kevin Hoffman, Designing meetings to work for design

Designing services for messy lives by Andy Polaine

  1. Identify crevasses in your product experience and minimise them.
  2. If you don’t design it, someone else will.
  3. People have lives beyond the screen. Try to observe and understand their lives.
Andy Polaine, Designing services for messy lives

Andy Polaine, Designing services for messy lives

Conference recap by Steve Baty

  1. Small details are important.
  2. We are the humanising force. Understand people. Bring them in the design. Work with them.
  3. Lines between digital and physical spaces are getting blurred more and more.

UX Australia 2013 Day 1: Top 3 Insights

Here’s a highly synthesised version of the amazing talks I attended on Day 1 of UX Australia 2013.

Microinteractions: Designing with details by Dan Saffer

  1. Design is not about solving wicked problems.
  2. A microinteraction does one task well.
  3. Product experience is only as good as its smallest experience. Create signature moments!

Microinteractions: Designing with details by Dan Saffer

Our billion-dollar baby: From greed to good by Chris Paton

  1. Gambling can be designed for the good of the world.
  2. Slow down to go faster.
  3. Get a good scrum-master!

Microinteractions: Designing with details by Dan SafferOur billion-dollar baby: From greed to good by Chris Paton

How to run an effective Cultural Probe on your UX project by Matt Morphett and Rob McLellan

  1. Look at the longitudinal view of the user’s day.
  2. Brief all your participants together and look them in the eye while doing it.
  3. Provide an example entry in the diary to encourage expression of honest feelings.

How to run an effective Cultural Probe on your UX project by Matt Morphett and Rob McLellan

Usability and the art of gentle persuasion at Justice by John Murphy and Gavin Hince

  1. Find your REAL audience.
  2. Provide guidance for the lost. Demystify.
  3. Bring lots of “conceptual glue”!

Usability and the art of gentle persuasion at Justice by John Murphy and Gavin Hince

Winning proportions and frictionless navigation by Jon Deragon

  1. Navigation has a lot of baggage.
  2. Disproportionate navigation creates severe frustrations.
  3. Always ask: what have we adopted from the past and how is it applicable?

Winning proportions and frictionless navigation by Jon Deragon

Universal design for touch by Katja Forbes

  1. Sometimes, reinventing the wheel can change the world!
  2. Respect our elders when designing solutions, otherwise they won’t use your product.
  3. In text-to-speech, directive language sounds bossy. E.g. ‘Delete the event’ vs. ‘Deletes the event’

Universal design for touch by Katja Forbes

Two models of design-led innovation by Steve Baty

  1. Insight-led innovation and hypothesis-led innovation
  2. A 1-week rapid iteration includes: hypothesis > sprint > working prototype > test hypothesis.
  3. Use a time-lapse camera at a cafe to watch people. Get insights from their behaviours.

Two models of design-led innovation by Steve Baty

Agile ethnography in New York’s secret public spaces by Chris Holmes

  1. POPS (Privately Owned Public Space) are TOPS!
  2. Agile ethnography = Traditional ethnography + Agile methods. Don’t think too hard. Just f*cking do it!
  3. Everyone in your team is a researcher. Agile = adjust your expectations accordingly.

Agile ethnography in New York’s secret public spaces by Chris Holmes