Eye tracking mobile devices – now even easier with the Tobii X2 mobile device stand

Our dedicated love on mobile devices

During my commute to and from work each day, there’s one thing I must not forget to bring with me. It’s not my train ticket or my wallet, it’s my phone, and without it I am lost. The truth is I am not the only one; people love their smartphones and other mobile devices. People are spending more and more time on mobile devices and based on the latest Flurry’s analysis, 80% of that time was spent on apps. But, the question is: on which apps? A recent study by Compuware found that 79% of people will only give an app one or two tries, and if it doesn’t meet expectations they’ll never use it again.

As marketers, it’s critical to understand how to engage your consumers by providing a better experience when they use your mobile apps. The great news is, we have just the right solution for you!


Latest solution for mobile device eye tracking testing

Our latest Tobii Mobile Device Testing solution lets you study how consumers experience mobile websites and apps and how they engage with any mobile ads on mobile devices. Tobii X2 Eye Trackers, paired with the Tobii Mobile Device Stand, provide a dedicated solution for efficient and high quality testing of mobile devices and tablets.

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Accurate, the solution delivers highly accurate data you need to test small devices, where logos, text and buttons might all be within one degree of visual angle distance and any compromise on accuracy can lead to the wrong conclusions.

Efficient, we can take the eye tracker to any location where it is convenient to run your tests, you have enormous options in recruiting participants.

Flexibility and natural interaction, the solution allows test participants to interact with the mobile device in a natural way, creating a distraction-free user experience. Users can take hold of the device, smoothly rotate the device between landscape and portrait modes, and interact with it from a comfortable viewing angle.

High quality data, suitable for both quantitative and qualitative studies that require high quality behavioural data. The fixed mounted high-definition (HD) scene camera captures the details needed to analyse small screens.

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We’re here to help you get on the front foot

Interbrand, a corporate identity and brand consulting firm, recently ranked Apple the most valuable brand in the world, it’s the first time Coca-Cola hasn’t topped that list since it was first published in 2000. The world as we know is changing and mobile devices are a huge part of it. Websites worldwide now get more traffic from mobile devices than PC, people browse 70% more web pages per visit. It’s time to get on the front foot of your consumer mobile experience and we’re here to help.

Click here for a quick video introduction to our mobile device testing solution!

Yoana Francisca

Don’t bother me, I’m busy: Look through the eyes of your call centre staff

Traditional methods of user research and requirements gathering have long served us to help shape our designs. But as systems become more complex and users go beyond the screen, we are finding that it is getting more and more difficult to get accurate data on why our users, customers and even your staff are doing the things they do.

You customer sees a lot of things about you

You customer sees a lot of things about you

Often, it is difficult to get buy-in from stakeholders just based on verbatim comments from customer or insights based on the designer’s experience. This is where we’ve found eye tracking to be really valuable. It puts the science behind the hypotheses and clears up a lot of arguments.

Do you see what your customers see?

Do you see what your customers see?

Contextual inquiry has been a researcher’s best friend for a while now. It’s a tried and true research method which helps collect insights from the field without having to rely on the user’s memory or articulateness. But what users say they do and what they do are not enough to draw a complete picture of what’s happening. Many questions can be answered by where they look because the design of the system dictates the eye movements of the user.

Eye tracking helps you see what your customers see

Eye tracking helps you see what your customers see

Eye tracking enables the researcher to uncover subconscious eye movements of the user while using the system. Most of these eye movements happen without the user’s control or knowledge. More importantly, with eye tracking we can understand a busy person’s experience without distracting them from the task at hand, for example a call centre operator.

In a recent study of call centre systems, we observed where call centre operators looked at while serving customers over the phone. We found that the flow of the operators’ eye gaze on the screen was completely opposite to how the interface was laid out. This resulted in higher levels of stress for the operator as they had to constantly look for information on the screen and it was straining on their eyes as well. Even the operators and the stakeholders were surprised when they saw how their eyes were moving.

If you would like to learn more about conducting user research with an eye tracker, we have written a white paper on it that explains in more detail our eye tracking methodology and how you can introduce eye tracking into your lean UX processes. Download the white paper and drop us a line if you any questions.