UX Australia 2013 Day 2: Top 3 Insights

Here’re the top 3 insights from Day 2 which follow the top 3 insights from Day 1.

Groundhogs in the source code: Navigation as cross-channel sense-making by Andrea Resmini

  1. People create their own meanings in places within physical and digital navigational meshes.
  2. Place is a way to understand the world. Intent and meaning is more important than geometry.
  3. The web is a map that leads to somewhere real.
    Andrea Resmini, Groundhogs in the source code: Navigation as cross-channel sense-making

Andrea Resmini, Groundhogs in the source code: Navigation as cross-channel sense-making

One team, one dream: Practical ways to work better, together by Kelsey Schwenk

  1. Traditional methods (such as personality tests) of categorising people into cubicles is flawed.
  2. The VIEW model developed by the Center for Creative Learning looks at relative scales of problem solving styles instead.
  3. We lie somewhere in the following scales: Internal vs. External, Explorer vs. Developer, Person-oriented vs. Task-oriented.
    Kelsey Schwenk, One team, one dream: Practical ways to work better, together

Kelsey Schwenk, One team, one dream: Practical ways to work better, together

Gesture control: Wave goodbye to your remote control and say hello to the future by Sean Smith

  1. There are 2 types of gesture: pointing and semantic.
  2. A combination of the two is preferred by most.
  3. Use both universally common gestures and customised culture-specific gestures.
    Sean Smith, Gesture control: Wave goodbye to your remote control and say hello to the future

Sean Smith, Gesture control: Wave goodbye to your remote control and say hello to the future

From faith-based to evidence-based design: Design by numbers by Miles Rochford

  1. Design decisions based on just intuition are not going to cut it anymore. We need evidence backed by data.
  2. Data is not about proving yourself right or wrong.
  3. Data is not automatically useful.
Miles Rochford, From faith-based to evidence-based design

Miles Rochford, From faith-based to evidence-based design

Designing surveys to get the responses you want! by Hendrik Müller

  1. 10 steps to designing surveys that get unbiased, valid and reliable data: 1. Decide if the survey is the right method 2. Objectives 3. Sampling 4. Questions 5. Avoiding biases 6. Visual design 7. Evaluation 8. Building 9. Fielding 10. Analysis.
  2. People answer more honestly if the survey is anonymous.
  3. People cannot predict the future. Ask about shortcomings, not wish lists.
Hendrik Müller, Designing surveys to get the responses you want

Hendrik Müller, Designing surveys to get the responses you want

Getting UX done by Ian Fenn

  1. Call it ‘critique’, not ‘design review’.
  2. Have smaller pre-meetings before the big meeting.
  3. DILLIGAF!
Ian Fenn, Getting UX done

Ian Fenn, Getting UX done

Designing meetings to work for design by Kevin Hoffman

  1. To help people hear better, start with divergent thinking followed by convergent thinking.
  2. To help people see better, use graphic facilitation (visual note taking).
  3. To help people do better, present and design ideas collaboratively. For example, for each section on the homepage, collectively answer who needs it and what they will do with it.
Kevin Hoffman, Designing meetings to work for design

Kevin Hoffman, Designing meetings to work for design

Designing services for messy lives by Andy Polaine

  1. Identify crevasses in your product experience and minimise them.
  2. If you don’t design it, someone else will.
  3. People have lives beyond the screen. Try to observe and understand their lives.
Andy Polaine, Designing services for messy lives

Andy Polaine, Designing services for messy lives

Conference recap by Steve Baty

  1. Small details are important.
  2. We are the humanising force. Understand people. Bring them in the design. Work with them.
  3. Lines between digital and physical spaces are getting blurred more and more.
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